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Summer 2020 Course Descriptions

 

All students with more than 90 cumulative units (completed + enrolled) MUST SEND A MESSAGE THROUGH THE VIRTUAL ADVISING CENTER (VAC) TO BE PREAUTHORIZED TO ENROLL.

  • IMPORTANT NOTE: Students on the waitlist who miss any class meeting of Muir Writing will be considered NOT ELIGIBLE TO ENROLL in the course. Enrolled students who miss the first two class sessions will be dropped. Responsibility for dropping the class from the Registrar’s records belongs solely to the student.

TOPICS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE

The reading and writing requirements are the same for all sections. 

Textbooks can be purchased through the UC San Diego Bookstore!

The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition

by Booth, Colomb, Williams, Bizup, and Fitzgerald

A Writer's Reference, Ninth Edition

Writers-Reference-Ninth-Edition.jpg

by Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers

Please purchase the 9th edition of the Writer's Reference from the bookstore, as we have a version that is specific for UC San Diego's Writing Programs (Muir and Warren colleges).

Photocopied Reader

Each class will have its own required reader that can be purchased through UCSD bookstore.

 Summer 2020

 

MCWP 40 

Summer Session 2

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 019656

A00

TTH 11:00-1:50pm REMOTE

Kelly Silva

Thank U, Next: Cultural Imperialism and Politically Enchanting Plots

Summer Session 2

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 019663

A00

MW 11:00-1:50pm

REMOTE

Nur Duru

How do sensationalized tales of pop stars, superheroes, princesses, and villains shape our understandings of majority and minority communities? Just as Ariana Grande “breaks free” from “7 rings” of systemic oppression—sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, nationality, dis/ability—students in this class will unpack the overlapping layers of popular culture, ideology, representation, oppression, and privilege. In this course students will analyze arguments about how stories function to replicate, resist, and rewrite the dominant narratives that shape our educational, legal, medical, and social institutions while researching and writing a research-based argument about an issue relevant to the course topic.

Disability and Popular Culture

Summer Session 2

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 019664

B00

MW 8:00-10:50am REMOTE

Laurie Nies

Upwards of 43 million Americans are currently experiencing some kind of physical, cognitive, or sensory impairment, and that number is on the rise. And yet despite the pervasiveness of these kinds of disabilities among the U.S. population, and despite the fact that disabled people comprise one of the largest U.S. minority groups, disabled figures are often stereotyped in movies, comic books, commercials, novels, and on television shows, as being deserving of the viewer’s pity, or as being excessively courageous because of their ability to overcome what is often portrayed as a troubled or difficult existence. These stereotypes mark disabled people as ‘other’, thus marginalizing an already marginalized population. In this course, we will examine popular representations of disability to uncover assumptions about the normal or ideal body. We will read scholarship from a variety of perspectives that consider impairments in relation to history, nationality, race, gender, and sexuality. In the process, students will apply this scholarship—and their own independent research—to a popular cultural form with the objective of making and defending an argument about disability in a research paper.

Cultures of Crime

Summer Session 2

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 019666

C00

MW 2:00-4:50pm

REMOTE

Melinda Guillen

Everyone says we need to stop crime, but crime seems to happen whether we want it to or not. Some even make a living from it. How we treat those who have broken rules has changed over time as our morals and definitions of crimes have evolved. In this course, we will consider how modern society identifies and reacts to criminals and how punishment is determined by examining a variety of scholarly arguments that cross crime with subjects such as the US Justice System, terrorism, revenge, class, gender, and pop culture.

Bioethical Quandaries

Summer Session 2

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 019667

D00 

TTH 8:00-10:50am

REMOTE

Sophie Staschus

The interdisciplinary field of bioethics grapples with conflicts that arise in medical practice, such as patients’ refusal of life-saving treatment or how to allocate scarce resources such as organs. It also considers dilemmas that emerge in response to new biotechnologies, such as stem-cell research, human genetic engineering, and prenatal diagnostics. In this course, we will explore some of the ethical and legal questions that arise in healthcare, medical research, and the use of biotechnology and bioengineering. In keeping with the goals and requirements of MCWP 50, you will examine arguments about this topic in an effort to understand their structures while introducing and supporting your own informed research-based argument about an issue relevant to the course topic.