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Degree Requirements

Learn more about what you need to do to graduate and to make the most of your time at Muir College!

To graduate, you must complete the requirements listed under University Requirements, and the 4 sections on Muir General Education. In addition, you must complete a major. See the Major Requirements Section for more information.

UC San Diego requirements (First year and Transfer Students)

Every UC San Diego student must complete the following requirements for their degree. 

Entry-Level Writing Requirement

The University of California requires all undergraduate students (including international students) to demonstrate a minimum proficiency in English composition within three quarters of entering the University. For more information on the various ways to meet the requirement, go to https://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/elwr/.

For more information about the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement, the Writing Placement Process (WPP), or the Analytical Writing Program’s course offerings, please visit the program’s website at http://awp.ucsd.edu/.

American History and Institutions (AH&I)

Knowledge of American history and of the principles of American institutions under the federal and state constitutions is required of all candidates for a bachelor's degree. This requirement may be met in any one of the following ways:

  • Passing one high-school unit in American history, or one-half high school unit in American history and one-half high-school unit in civics or American government with a grade of C or better
  • Passing with a grade of P or C– or better any of these UC San Diego classes: HILD 2A-B-C, HILD 7A-B-C, or any course listed under HIUS (other than HIUS Colloquia); ECON 158, 159; ETHN 103A, 112A-B, 120D, 125, 130, 131, 149, 153, 163J, 167, 169, 170; POLI 10, 10D, 100A-B-C, 102C, 102H, 104A, 110EA-EB, 110J, 142A; SOCI 10, 188K; and USP 103, 106, 167.
  • A score of 550 or more on the SAT II subject test of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) in American history.
  • A score of 3 or higher on the Advanced Placement test in American history.
  • Satisfying the AH&I  requirement as administered at another collegiate institution within the state.
  • Passing an approved  course in either American history or American government with a C or better at a California community college.
  • Passing an approved  course in either American history or American government with a C or better at a college or university outside of California.

The Requirement in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

A knowledge of diversity, equity, and inclusion is required of all candidates for a Bachelor's degree who begin their studies at UC San Diego in lower-division standing in Fall 2011 or thereafter, or in upper-division standing in Fall 2013 or thereafter.

  • Students can satisfy this requirement by passing, with a grade of at least C– or P, a one-quarter, four-unit course expressly approved by the Undergraduate Council for that purpose.
  • Transfer courses can only satisfy this requirement if they are considered equivalent to a specific UCSD course already approved to satisfy this requirement; you cannot petition a transfer course to count for the requirement based on similar content. 
  • See current List of DEI Approved Courses 

Jane Teranes Climate Change Education Requirement (Fall 2024 and later firs-year admits only)

A knowledge of climate change is required of all candidates for a Bachelor’s degree who begin their studies at UC San Diego in lower-division standing in Fall 2024 or thereafter.

  • Students can satisfy this requirement by passing, with a grade of at least C– or P, a one-quarter, four-unit course expressly approved by the Undergraduate Council for that purpose.
  • This requirement is required of all candidates for a Bachelor’s degree who begin their studies at UC San Diego as a first-year student.
  • Transfer students are not required to satisfy this requirement.

Overlaps

  • Courses used for the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Requirement, Jane Teranes Climate Change Education Requirement, and American History and Institutions (AHI) requirements may also be used to fulfill any other requirement for graduation including major, minor, and/or Muir general education requirements.
  •  AH & I is not required for students on F-1 or J-1 visas. The college will waive AHI at the end of your final quarter when processing your Degree and Diploma Application (DDA).

Grade Point Average

You must have a grade point average of 2.0 or higher in courses completed at the University of California in order to graduate.

Pass/No Pass Grading

No more than 25% of your UCSD units at the time you graduate can be taken on a pass/no pass. You must take AWP 3, AWP 4B, MCWP 40, MCWP 50, MCWP 50R, MCWP 125, and MCWP 125R for a letter grade to count toward fulfilling writing requirements.

Quarter Limitation

Students entering as Freshmen will have a maximum limit of 12 quarters and Transfer students will have a maximum of 6 quarters to finish their degrees. If a student reaches the quarter limit and needs additional time, they will be required to submit a completion plan and have it approved by their college to get an extension to continue to enroll at UC San Diego.

Minimum Progress

Full time students must complete a minimum of 36 units per year. Unless you come in a large number of transfer units, you will generally need to pass more than 36 units per year to graduate within the quarter limitation.

Senior Residency

35 of your final 45 units must be completed at UCSD to satisfy the Senior Residency requirement. You may petition to waive this if you study abroad in your final quarter.

Muir General Education (First Year Students)

Muir College Writing (2 classes)

  • You must complete 2 courses: MCWP 40 and MCWP 50 with a letter grade of D or higher after satisfying the campus Entry-Level Writing Requirement.
  • We do not accept AP, IB, or A-level credit for this requirement.
  • We do not allow community college courses to substitute for these classes.
  • First year students must complete Muir Writing in their first 6 quarters.
  • After this time limit, you will only be able to wait list the writing class in the second pass (or find one of the rare seats in the class still open in the second pass.) We intentionally do this to prevent our writing classes filling with seniors putting off the requirement before students take the classes in their first year or two when we intend you to take them!

Area 1: Math or Natural Sciences (3 classes)

Complete one of the following four interdisciplinary themes below.

Math or Natural Science Theme 1: Math and Statistics (3 courses from the list below)

  • BILD 5
  • CSE 4GS
  • COGS 14A
  • COGS 14B
  • HDS 60
  • MATH 3B
  • MATH 3C
  • MATH 4C
  • MATH 10A or 20A
  • MATH 10B or 20B
  • MATH 10C or 20C
  • MATH 11
  • MATH 18
  • MATH 31AH
  • MATH 31BH
  • MATH 31CH
  • MGT 3
  • POLI 30 or 30D
  • PSYC 60
  • PSYC 70
  • SOCI 60


Math or Natural Science Theme 2: Biological Sciences (3 courses from the list below)

  • ANTH 2 (or 102*)
  • ANTH 5
  • ANTH 42
  • ANTH 43
  • BILD 1
  • BILD 2
  • BILD 3
  • BILD 7
  • BILD 10
  • BILD 12
  • BILD 18
  • BILD 20
  • BILD 22
  • BILD 26
  • BILD 28
  • BILD 30
  • BILD 32
  • BILD 36
  • BILD 38
  • BILD 42
  • BILD 44
  • BILD 45GS
  • BILD 46
  • BILD 46GS
  • BILD 60
  • BILD 61
  • COGS 17


Math or Natural Science Theme 3:  Physical Sciences (3 courses from the list below)

  • ASTR 1
  • ASTR 2
  • ASTR 3
  • ASTR 4
  • ASTR 10
  • ASTR 15
  • ASTR 18
  • ASTR 20A
  • ASTR 20B
  • CHEM 4
  • CHEM 6A or 6AH
  • CHEM 6B or 6BH
  • CHEM 6C or 6CH
  • CHEM 11
  • ENVR 30
  • ENVR 105
  • ENVR 110
  • ENVR 120
  • ENVR 140
  • ENVR 142GS
  • ESYS 10
  • PHYS 1A and AL
  • PHYS 1B and 1BL
  • PHYS 1C and CL
  • PHYS 2A
  • PHYS 2B
  • PHYS 2C
  • PHYS 4A
  • PHYS 4B
  • PHYS 4C
  • PHYS 8
  • PHYS 10
  • PHYS 11
  • PHYS 12
  • SIO 1
  • SIO 3
  • SIO 10
  • SIO 10GS
  • SIO 12
  • SIO 15
  • SIO 16
  • SIO 20
  • SIO 25
  • SIO 30
  • SIO 35
  • SIO 40
  • SIO 45
  • SIO 45GS
  • SIO 46GS


Math or Natural Science Theme 4: Computing and logic (3 courses from the list below)

  • BILD 62
  • COGS 3
  • COGS 8
  • COGS 9
  • COGS 18
  • CSE 3
  • CSE 5A
  • CSE 8A
  • CSE 8B
  • CSE 11
  • CSE 12
  • CSS 1
  • CSS 2
  • ECE 15
  • ECON 5 or POLI 5D
  • LIGN 6
  • LIGN 17
  • MAE 5
  • MAE 8
  • PHIL 10
  • PHIL 12
  • USP 4

 
Area 2: Social Sciences (3 classes)

Complete one of the following four interdisciplinary themes below. 

Social Science Theme 1: Culture, Society and Social Justice (3 courses from the list below)

  • AAS 10
  • AAS 11
  • AAS 14
  • AAS 15 
  • ANTH 1 or 103 
  • ANTH 3 or 101
  • ANTH 10
  • ANTH 21
  • ANTH 23
  • ANTH 24
  • ANTH 45
  • ANTH 101
  • ANTH 102
  • ANTH 103
  • ANTH 104
  • ANTH 105
  • ANTH 106
  • ANTH 108
  • CGS 2A
  • CGS 2B
  • CGS 101
  • CGS 105
  • CGS 110
  • CGS 111
  • CGS 112 or ETHN 127
  • CGS 116
  • CGS 123
  • EDS 25
  • ETHN 1
  • ETHN 2
  • ETHN 3
  • ETHN 20
  • ETHN 30
  • GLBH 20
  • SOCI 1
  • SOCI 2
  • SOCI 10
  • SOCI 20
  • SOCI 30
  • SOCI 40
  • SOCI 50
  • SOCI 70

 

Social Science Theme 2: Language and Communication (3 courses from the list below)

  • ANTH 4
  • COMM 10
  • COMM 20
  • COMM 30
  • COMM 30GS
  • COMM 80
  • DSGN 1
  • LIGN 3
  • LIGN 4
  • LIGN 5
  • LIGN 7
  • LIGN 8
  • LIGN 9GS
  • LIGN 101
  • LIGN 105
  • LIGN 108
  • LIGN 149GS
  • LIGN 175
  • LIGN 176
  • LIGN 177
  • LIGN 178 
  • MGT 18

 

Social Science Theme 3: Mind and Cognition  (3 courses from the list below)

  • COGS 1
  • COGS 2
  • COGS 10
  • COGS 11
  • COGS 13
  • COGS 15
  • COGS 20 (or MUS 20)
  • HDS 1
  • PSYC 1
  • PSYC 2
  • PSYC 3
  • PSYC 4
  • PSYC 6
  • PSYC 7

 

SocialScience Theme 4: Government and Economics  (3 courses from the list below)

  • ECON 1
  • ECON 2
  • ECON 3
  • ECON 138
  • GLBH 20
  • POLI 10 or 10D
  • POLI 11 or 11D
  • POLI 12 or 12D
  • POLI 13 or 13D
  • USP 1
  • USP 2
  • USP 3
  • USP 5
  • USP 15
  • USP 25

 

Area 3: Choose two options from Fine Arts, Humanities, or a Language Other than English (6 classes)

Fine Arts

If you choose Fine Arts as one of your two options in Area 3, complete 3 courses from one of the themes below:

Theme 1: Music

  • MUS 1A
  • MUS 1B
  • MUS 1C
  • MUS 2A
  • MUS 2B
  • MUS 2C
  • MUS 4
  • MUS 5
  • MUS 6
  • MUS 7
  • MUS 8
  • MUS 8GS
  • MUS 9
  • MUS 10
  • MUS 11
  • MUS 12
  • MUS 13
  • MUS 14
  • MUS 15
  • MUS 16
  • MUS 17
  • MUS 18 (if taken for 4 units)
  • MUS 19
  • MUS 126
  • MUS 127
  • MUS 150

 

Theme 2: Theatre and Dance

  • tDAC 1
  • TDDE 1
  • TDDM 1
  • TDDM 5
  • TDDM 100
  • TDDM 101
  • TDGE 1
  • TDGE 3
  • TDGE 5
  • TDGE 10
  • TDGE 11
  • TDGE 12
  • TDGE 25
  • TDGE 89
  • TDGE 100
  • TDGE 105
  • TDGE 124
  • TDGE 125
  • TDGE 126
  • TDGE 131 or ETHN 163F*
  • TDGE 133
  • TDGE 134 
  • TDPW 1
  • TDTR 10
  • TDTR 15
  • TDTR 20
  • TDHD 20
  • TDHD 21
  • TDHD 175
  • TDHT 10
  • TDHT 21
  • TDHT 22
  • TDHT 23
  • TDHT 103
  • TDHT 104
  • TDHT 105
  • TDHT 107
  • TDHT 108
  • TDHT 109
  • TDHT 110 or ETHN 132
  • TDHT 111 or ETHN 133*
  • TDHT 114
  • TDHT 115
  • TDHT 119
  • TDHT 120 or ETHN 163G
  • TDMV 1
  • TDMV 2
  • TDMV 3
  • TDMV 5
  • TDMV 11
  • TDMV 20

 

 

 Theme 3: Visual Arts

  • USP 6
  • VIS 1
  • VIS 2
  • VIS 3
  • VIS 6
  • VIS 7
  • VIS 8
  • VIS 9
  • VIS 10
  • VIS 11
  • VIS 20
  • VIS 21A
  • VIS 21B
  • VIS 21C
  • VIS 22
  • VIS 23
  • VIS 30
  • VIS 31
  • VIS 32
  • VIS 41
  •  VIS 60
  • VIS 70N
  • VIS 83
  • VIS 84
  • VIS 84B
  • VIS 85A
  • VIS 85B

 

 


Humanities

If you choose Humanities as one of your two options in Area III, complete 3 courses from one of the themes below:

Theme 1: Historical Narratives

  • GSS 20
  • GSS 21
  • GSS 22
  • GSS 23
  • GSS 25
  • GSS 26 
  • GSS 27
  • HILD 2A
  • HILD 2B
  • HILD 2C
  • HILD 7A
  • HILD 7B
  • HILD 7C
  • HILD 50
  • HILD 60
  • HILD 8GS
  • HILD 10
  • HILD 11
  • HILD 12
  • HILD 14
  • HILD 20
  • HILD 30
  • HILD 30GS
  • HILD 40
  • HILD 41
  • HILD 42
  • HILD 43
  • HIUS 103 or ETHN 103A
  • HIUS 108A or ETHN 112A
  •  
  • HIUS 108B or ETHN 112B
  • HIUS 112
  • HIUS 113 or ETHN 154
  • HIUS 125 or ETHN 163J
  • HIUS 125GS
  • HIUS 128
  • HIUS 136 or ETHN 153
  • HIUS 157
  • HIUS 158 or ETHN 130
  • HIUS 159 or ETHN 131
  • HIUS 180 or ETHN 134
  • LATI 10
  • LATI 50
 

 

Theme 2: Literary Narratives

  • AWP 10
  • GSS 132
  • LTCS 50
  • LTCS 119 (or CGS 119*)
  • LTEN 21
  • LTEN 22
  • LTEN 23
  • LTEN 25
  • LTEN 26
  • LTEN 27
  • LTEN 28
  • LTEN 29
  • LTEN 31
  • LTEN 171
  • LTEN 178 (or ETHN 168*)
  • LTEN 181
  • LTEN 185 
  • LTWL 19A
  • LTWL 19B
  • LTWL 19C 
  • LTWR 8A
  • LTWR 8B
  • LTWR 8C 
  • TDHT 10

 

Theme 3: Philosophical Perspectives

  • MGT 16
  • PHIL 1
  • PHIL 13
  • PHIL 14
  • PHIL 15
  • PHIL 16
  • PHIL 24
  • PHIL 25
  • PHIL 26
  • PHIL 27 (or POLI 27)
  • PHIL 28 (or POLI 28)
  • PHIL 31
  • PHIL 32
  • PHIL 33
  • PHIL 35
  • PHIL 50
  • PHIL 51
  • PHIL 55
  • PHIL 60
  • PHIL 155
  • PHIL 156
  • PHIL 165
  • PHIL 170
  • RELI 1
  • RELI 2
  • RELI 3

 

Language Other Than English

If you choose a Language Other Than English as one of your two options in Area III, complete 3 courses from one of the language lists below.

  • You cannot mix languages -- all courses must be from one language.
  • AP, IB, or transfer units may count toward this requirement.
  • Proficiency exams or language proficiency may not count toward this requirement. 
  • Our requirement is that you complete college-level coursework for these requirements in humanities or humanities-adjacent coursework. This is why you cannot use language proficiency. It's great that you are multilingual. If you don't want more language coursework, choose humanities and fine arts.

American Sign Language

  • LISL 1A and 1AX (or 5A)
  • LISL 1B and 1BX (or 5B)
  • LISL 1C and 1CX (or 5C
  • LISL 1D and 1DX
  • LISL 1E

Arabic

  • LIAB 1A and 1AX
  • LIAB 1B and 1BX
  • LIAB 1C and 1CX

Cantonese (for Cantonese speakers)

  • LIHL 118F
  • LIHL 118W
  • LIHL 118P
  • LIHL 138F
  • LIHL 138W
  • LIHL 138P 

Chinese (Mandarin)

  • CHIN 10A
  • CHIN 10B
  • CHIN 10C
  • CHIN 20A
  • CHIN 20B
  • CHIN 20C
  • CHIN 100A
  • CHIN 100B
  • CHIN 100C
  • CHIN 160
  • CHIN 165A
  • CHIN 165B
  • CHIN 165C
  • CHIN 169A
  • CHIN 169B
  • CHIN 182A
  • CHIN 182B
  • CHIN 182C
  • CHIN 185A
  • CHIN 185B
  • CHIN 185C
  • CHIN 186A
  • CHIN 186B
  • CHIN 186C

Filipino (for Filipino speakers)

  • LIHL 112F
  • LIHL 112W
  • LIHL 112P
  • LIHL 132F
  • LIHL 132W
  • LIHL 132P

French

  • LIFR 1A and 1AX
  • LIFR 1B and 1BX
  • LIFR 1C and 1CX
  • LIFR 1D and 1DX
  • LTFR 2A
  • LTFR 2B
  • LTFR 2C
  • LTFR 50
  • LTFR 104
  • LTFR 115
  • LTFR 116
  • LTFR 121

German

  • LIGM 1A and 1AX
  • LIGM 1B and 1BX
  • LIGM 1C and 1CX
  • LIGM 1D and 1DX
  • LTGM 2A
  • LTGM 2B
  • LTGM 2C
  • LTGM 50
  • LTGM 100
  • LTGM 101
  • LTGM 130, 132
  • LTGM 134

Greek (Ancient)

  • LTGK 1
  • LTGK 2
  • LTGK 3
  • LTGK 101
  • LTGK 102
  • LTGK 103
  • LTGK 104

Hebrew

  • JWSP 1
  • JWSP 2
  • JWSP 3

Hindi

  • LIHI 1A and 1AX
  • LIHI 1B and 1BX
  • LIHI 1C and 1CX
  • LIHI 1D and 1DX

Hindi (for Hindi speakers)

  • LIHL 119F
  • LIHL 119W
  • LIHL 119P
  • LIHL 139F
  • LIHL 139W
  • LIHL 139P

Italian

  • LIIT 1A and 1AX
  • LIIT 1B and 1BX
  • LIIT 1C and 1CX
  • LIIT 1D and 1DX
  • LTIT 2A
  • LTIT 2B
  • LTIT 2C
  • LTIT  50
  • LTIT 100
  • LTIT 115
  • LTIT 122
  • LTIT 137
  • LTIT 161

Japanese 

  • JAPN 10A 
  • JAPN 10B 
  • JAPN 10C 
  • JAPN 20A 
  • JAPN 20B 
  • JAPN 20C 
  • JAPN 130A 
  • JAPN 130B 
  • JAPN 130C 
  • JAPN 140A 
  • JAPN 140B 
  • JAPN 140C 
  • JAPN 150A 
  • JAPN 150B 
  • JAPN 150C

Korean

  • LTKO 1A
  • LTKO 1B
  • LTKO 1C
  • LTKO 2A
  • LTKO 2B
  • LTKO 2C
  • LTKO 130
  • LTKO 140

 Korean (for Korean speakers)

  • LIHL 115F
  • LIHL 115W
  • LIHL 115P
  • LIHL 135F
  • LIHL 135W
  • LIHL 135P

Persian (for Persian speakers)

  • LIHL 17
  • LIHL 117F
  • LIHL 117W
  • LIHL 117P
  • LIHL 137F
  • LIHL 137W
  • LIHL 137P

Portuguese

  • LIPO 1A and 1AX
  • LIPO 1B and 1BX
  • LIPO 1C and 1CX

Russian

  • LTRU 1A
  • LTRU 1B
  • LTRU 1C
  • LTRU 2A
  • LTRU 2B
  • LTRU 104A
  • LTRU 104B
  • LTRU 104C

Spanish

  • LISP 1A and 1AX (or LISP 5A*)
  • LISP 1B and 1BX (or LISP 5B*)
  • LISP 1C and1CX (or LISP 5C*)
  • LISP 1D and 1DX (or LISP 5D*)
  • LISP 15
  • LISP 16
  • LISP 17
  • LISP 18
  • LTSP 2A
  • LTSP 2B
  • LTSP 2C
  • LTSP 2D
  • LTSP 2E
  • LTSP 50A
  • LTSP 50B
  • LTSP 50C
  • LTSP 100A
  • LTSP 100B
  • LTSP 101
  • LTSP 116
  • LTSP 123
  • LTSP 135A
  • LTSP 135B
  • LTSP 137
  • LTSP 138
  • LTSP 150
  • LTSP 150A
  • LTSP 150B

Vietnamese (for Vietnamese speakers)

  • LIHL 114F
  • LIHL 114W
  • LIHL 114P
  • LIHL 134F
  • LIHL 134W
  • LIHL 134P

 

Overlaps

  • You may use up to 3 courses from your major to fulfill  Muir general education requirements.
  • Students with an approved double major may use up to 6 courses from both majors to fulfill Muir general education requirements. 
  • Any number of courses used to fulfill minor requirements may also count toward Muir general education requirements.

Muir General Education (Transfer Students)

The GE requirements for students admitted by transfer from another college or university. 

If you completed IGETC

You must submit your IGETC certification along with your transcript to UCSD Admissions to count as having IGETC complete. If you are IGETC complete, you must complete:

  • One writing class, MCWP 125 or MCWP 125R. 
    • We will also allow a lower-division class, MCWP 50 or MCWP 50R to satisfy this requirement. 
    • We do not accept AP, IB, or A-level credit for this requirement.
    • We do not allow community college courses to substitute for these classes.
  • Transfer students must complete Muir Writing in their first 3 quarters.
    • After this time limit, you will only be able to wait list the writing class in the second pass (or find one of the rare seats in the class still open in the second pass.)
    • We intentionally do this to prevent our writing classes filling with seniors putting off the requirement before students take the classes in their first year or two when we intend you to take them!

If you completed Partial IGETC

You must submit your partial  IGETC certification along with your transcript to UCSD Admissions to count as having partial IGETC. If you are partial IGETC, you must complete:

  •  1-2 ourses corresponding to your missing 1-2 IGETC areas
  • One writing class, MCWP 125 or MCWP 125R. 
    • We will also allow a lower-division class, MCWP 50 or MCWP 50R to satisfy this requirement. 
    • We do not accept AP, IB, or A-level credit for this requirement.
    • We do not allow community college courses to substitute for these classes.
  • Transfer students must complete Muir Writing in their first 3 quarters.
    • After this time limit, you will only be able to wait list the writing class in the second pass (or find one of the rare seats in the class still open in the second pass.)
    • We intentionally do this to prevent our writing classes filling with seniors putting off the requirement before students take the classes in their first year or two when we intend you to take them!

Transfer from another 4-year college or university

If you completed General Education at another college or university, you must submit a Letter of Reciprocity from another UC campus or an letter verifying your completion of General Education from an academic advisor or the Registrar of your previous college or university. If you do, you must complete:

  • Two writing classes, MCWP 40 and MCWP 50 
    • You may petition to use courses from a four-year university count toward these requirements.
    • We do not accept AP, IB, or A-level credit for this requirement.
    • We do not allow community college courses to substitute for these classes.
  • Transfer students must complete Muir Writing in their first 3 quarters.
    • After this time limit, you will only be able to wait list the writing class in the second pass (or find one of the rare seats in the class still open in the second pass.)
    • We intentionally do this to prevent our writing classes filling with seniors putting off the requirement before students take the classes in their first year or two when we intend you to take them!

All other transfer students 

Everyone else will be held to all of the General Education Requirements for first year students. An advisor will evaluate your transcripts during Fall Quarter to try to use as many courses toward GE requirements as possible. You will need to complete both MCWP 40 and MCWP 50

Associate's Degree

Completion of an Associate's in (typically an A.A. or A.S.), including an Associate's for Transfer (which only applies to the California State University system)  does not fulfill General Education Requirements by itself. You must complete IGETC to count for your GEs or you need to fulfill the requirements listed under "All other transfer students."

7-Course Pattern

The Seven-Course Pattern is the minimum requirement for admission to UCSD. It does not fulfill General Education Requirements by itself. You must complete IGETC to count for your GEs or you need to fulfill the requirements listed under "All other transfer students."

Previous Muir General Education (First Years Admitted FALL 2020 AND BEFORE)

Muir College Writing Requirement

Muir College Writing Program (2 courses, 8 units)

  • MCWP 40 
  • MCWP 50 

MCWP courses must be taken for a letter grade.  

First-pass enrollment priority will be given to first year students during their first six quarters at UCSD. Beyond that, you will only be eligible to enroll during the second-pass enrollment period.

Area 1: Math or Natural Science 

Choose from one of the following options. You cannot mix and match. (3 courses, 12+ units).

  1. Choose 3 from BILD 7, 10, 12, 20, 22, 24, or 26
  2. BILD 10 or ENVR 30 | CHEM 4 or 11 | PHYS 8 or 10
  3. CHEM 6A or 6AH, CHEM 6B or 6BH, CHEM 6C or 6CH
  4. CHEM 11, 12, 13
  5. ENVR 30 | Choose 2 from BILD 18, PHYS 12, SIO 25 or ENVR 140
  6. MATH 10A or 20A; MATH 10B or 20B; MATH 10C or 20C or 11
  7. PHYS 1A+1AL; PHYS 1B + 1BL; PHYS 1C + 1CL
  8. PHYS 2A, 2B, 2C
  9. PHYS 4A, 4B, 4C
  10. Choose 3 courses from PHYS 5, 7, 9, 13
  11. Choose 3 from PHYS 8, 10, 11 or 12
  12. Choose 3 from SIO 1, 10, 20 or 30

Area 2: Social Science

Choose from one of the following options. You cannot mix and match. (3 courses, 12+ units)

  1. ANTH 1, 21, 23, or 103 | ANTH 2 or 102 | ANTH 3 or 101 
  2. COGS 1 | Choose 2 courses from COGS 10, 11, 17, or DSGN 1
  3. CGS 2A | CGS 2B | CGS 101, 103, 105, 106, 112, or 114
  4. ECON 1, 2, 3
  5. ETHN 1, 2, 3
  6. Choose 3 from LIGN 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 17
  7. Choose 3 from POLI 10/10D; 11/11D; 12/12D; or 13/13D
  8. Choose 3 from PSYC 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, or 7
  9. Choose 3 from AAS 10, COMM 10, ETHN 20 or MGT 18
  10. SOCI 1 | SOCI 2 | SOCI 10, 20, 30, 40, or 50
  11. USP 1, 2, 3

Area 3: Fine Arts, Humanities, Language Other than English (Choose 2)

Fine Arts (3 courses, 12 units): Choose from one of the following options. You cannot mix and match.

  1. MUS 1A, 1B, 1C
  2. MUS 2A, 2B, 2C
  3. MUS 4 | Choose 2 from MUS 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, or 18 (if taken for 4 units)
  4. MUS 126 | MUS 127 (taken twice for two different topics)
  5. TDGE 1 | Choose 2 from TDAC 1, TDDE 1, TDPW 1, or TDGE 3, 5, 10, or 11
  6. Choose 3 from TDHT 10, 21, 22 or 23
  7. VIS 11 | Choose two from VIS 1, 2, or 3
  8. Choose 3 from VIS 20, 21A, 21B, or 22
  9. VIS 22 | VIS 84 | VIS 151, 152D, 154, 156, 194S

Humanities (3 courses, 12 units): Choose from one of the following options. You cannot mix and match.

  1. HILD 2A, 2B, 2C; 
  2. HILD 7A, 7B, 7C
  3. HILD 10, 11, 12
  4. Choose 3 from LTEN 21, 22, 23, 25, or 26
  5. LTEN 27, 28, 29
  6. LTWL 19A, 19B, 19C
  7. LTWR 8A, 8B, 8C
  8. Choose 3 from PHIL 1, 13, 14, or 15
  9. Choose 3 from PHIL 10, 12, 15, 25, or 32
  10. Choose 3 from PHIL 13, 26, 27, 28, or 33
  11. PHIL 31, 32, 33
  12. Choose 3 from GSS 21, 22, 23 or 25

Foreign Language (3 courses, 12+ units): Choose from one of the following options. You cannot mix and match. Proficiency or fluency in a language other than English cannot clear this general education requirement.

  1. Choose 3 from CHIN 10A, 10B, 10C, 20A, 20B, 20C
  2. Choose 3 from JAPN 10A, 10B, 10C, 20A, 20B, 20C
  3. JWSP 1, 2, 3
  4. LIAB 1A+1AX, 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX
  5. Choose 3 from LIFR 1A+1AX, 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX, 1D+1DX; LTFR 2A, 2B, 2C, 50
  6. Choose 3 from LIGM 1A+1AX , 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX, 1D+1DX; LTGM 2A, 2B, 2C, 50
  7. Choose 3 from LIIT 1A+1AX , 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX, 1D+1DX; LTIT 2A, 2B, 2C, 50
  8. LIPO 1A+1AX, 1B+BX, 1C+1CX
  9. Choose 3 from LISL 1A+1AX, 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX, 1D+1DX
  10. Choose 3 from LISP 1A+1AX , 1B+1BX, 1C+1CX, 1D+1DX; LTSP 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 50
  11. LTGK 1, 2, 3
  12. Choose 3 from LTKO 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, or 2C
  13. LTLA 1, 2, 3
  14. Choose 3 from LTRU 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, or 2C
  15. 3 quarters of a heritage language

Most language courses are offered in a year-long sequence that begins in Fall quarter. Please see the Linguistics Language Program for details on course availability and placement.

Overlaps

  • You may use up to 3 courses from your major to fulfill  Muir general education requirements.
  • Students with an approved double major may use up to 6 courses from both majors to fulfill Muir general education requirements. 
  • Any number of courses used to fulfill minor requirements may also count toward Muir general education requirements.

Major Requirements (First Year and Transfer Students)

You Must Complete A Major

All students must complete at least one major to graduate. Minors are not required to graduate.

You Must Declare a Major at 90 Units

You must declare a major other than  Undeclared once you have 90 units, including AP, IB, and transfer credits. You may change your major after declaring your major. Having a declared major does not prevent you from applying for a Selective or Screened Major.

Selective Majors

Some majors are selective and limit the number of students who can declare that major. Generally,  you must be admitted to these majors at the time of admission. Selective majors usually have a process for students to transfer into those majors, but usually those processes are competitive and will not have enough space for all interested students. 

Screened Majors

Some majors only allow students to declare that major if they complete a set of screening classes with a minimum grade in those classes. They may not have a limit on number of students, but you will have to meet prerequisites to change into or add that major.

Double Majors

You must apply for and meet the criteria for double majors. Students are not automatically granted additional time to complete a double major, nor does a double major increase the time you are eligible for financial aid.

Double majors in and of themselvesare typically not particularly valuable for your earning potential, at least in the United States. Employers tend to be less interested in completing multiple majors or bachelor's degrees than they are in seeing either a degree or combination of degree and experience applicable to a job or progressively higher-level degrees. Generally speaking, a double major does not create the same value as a bachelor's degree and a master's degree. 

Often, it is the particular combination of coursework that indicates the value of a degree. Pursuing a double major for specific goals or personal satisfaction is a better reason for pursuing a double major rather than seeking a financial return on investment. 

In other words, it is probably not worth going into debt to stay for a 5th year or more just to finish a double major.

Minors

Minors are optional. Students may declare up to two minors. Students are not automatically granted additional time to complete a minor, nor does a double minor increase the time you are eligible for financial aid. Minors appear on your transcript, but not on your diploma.

Minors in and of themselvesare typically not particularly valuable for your earning potential, at least in the United States. The value in a minor is the coursework you complete along the way. Some minors (like Accounting or Education Studies) include coursework that can help you on the path to a professional certification or graduate degree. Others show your breadth or knowledge outside of your major. It's also reasonable to pursue a minor for personal satisfaction or intellectual interest. However, extending your degree just to complete a minor may not provide a financial return on investment. 

In other words, it is usually not financially worth going into debt to stay for a 5th year or more just to finish a minor.

Overlaps

  • You may use up to 3 courses from your major to fulfill  Muir general education requirements.
  • Students with an approved double major may use up to 6 courses from both majors to fulfill Muir general education requirements. 
  • Any number of courses used to fulfill minor requirements may also count toward Muir general education requirements.
  • Any number of lower-division courses may count for both your major and a minor. However, only a maximum of  two (2) upper-division courses (8 units) may be used for both your major and minor requirements.
  • Courses used for the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Requirement, Jane Teranes Climate Change Education Requirement, and American History and Institutions (AHI) requirements may also be used to fulfill any other requirement for graduation including major, minor, and/or Muir general education requirements.

Professional School Prerequisites

Depending on what you want to do after you graduate, you may need to plan your coursework around those options. The UC San Diego Career Services website contains information on how to prepare for several careers while at UCSD. 

In general, you can apply to any kind of professional school below with any major… so long as you have also completed the coursework needed to get into the school. So you can get into medical school with a Visual Arts major and the right preparatory classes and you can get into law school with a Structural Engineering degree… if you plan correctly. 

Pre-Health

There are several different paths for pre-health preparation that you can consider, each with its own prerequisites:


Pre-Law

Preparing for Law School is not as straightforward as preparing for medical school, because there is no set list of courses to complete. Instead, you are focusing on taking some related courses, learning to write and argue well, and working on developing your out-of class experiences to support your goals.

Pre-Business

Like law school, preparing for Business School is not marked very strongly by a particular kind of preparation. Depending on the school, it is more important for you to have work experience, which can include military service, entrepreneurship, volunteer or nonprofit work, as well as actual work experience. But it never hurts to take business related courses, including some courses in accounting, to get you on the right track.

Planning Your Degree

When planning your degree, consider several details:

View A Sample Graduation Plan For Your Major

The plans are available for all majors at http://plans.ucsd.edu.

Prerequisites and Restrictions

Some classes have prerequisites (classes you need to complete before you take the class) or restrictions (only certain students can take the course, like juniors and seniors) that restrict whether you can take the course. Take the prerequisites in particular seriously, since the course probably relies heavily on content from the prerequisites listed. Skipping into a class without prerequisites, even with the professor’s blessing, may be setting you up to get a disappointing grade in the course. 

When Are Courses Offered?

When planning out your classes for your major, also be aware that not all classes are offered every quarter. Some are offered every quarter, while others are offered only once or twice a year, and some are offered every other year, or even less frequently if they are major electives taught only by one professor. Most departments and programs will have a schedule of what classes are offered for the year on their website so you can plan accordingly.

Setting Up a Graduation Plan

Setting up a graduation plan is relatively simple if you can view your UCSD Academic History, your Degree Audit, and the graduation plan for your major

Review Your Graduation Plan

  • Go to https://plans.ucsd.edu and view the graduation plan for your major. All majors should have a four-year plan for students admitted as first year students and a plan for transfer students. Some also have a 3-year plan for first-year students who came in with a lot of units and want to graduate early. 
  • On the online degree planner, a spreadsheet, document, or a piece of paper (for you analog folks), copy down that four year plan as written.

Adjust The Plan

  • Now look at your  Degree Audit and your Academic History
  • Adjust your schedule and move around courses to account for:
    • Requirements you already have completed.
    • Requirements that you are enrolled in now.
    • Moving around courses that the plan says you should have completed or enrolled in but have not yet.

Check In With Your Advisors

  • Take your adjusted plan and consult with your academic advisors:
  • Start with your major advisor to make sure you are accounting for prerequisites and when courses are offered and update your plan accordingly.
  • Then meet with your college advisor to make sure you have accounted for all of your college GE requirements, university requirements, and have enough units to graduate. 
  • Your college advisor can also help you think about fitting in study abroad, research, work experience, and other options to make the most of your education!

Internships and Work Experience

There are several ways that you can begin thinking about and working on job and career experience while you are still as student.

  • The Academic Internship Program (AIP): AIP provides opportunities for students to earn academic credits for professional experience. Students must plan ahead and apply for opportunities, but can also come to AIP with an opportunity to build an internship course around. 
  • The Basement: The Basement works to bring students from different disciplines together to involve them in teams working on entrepreneurial opportunities. 
  • The Career Center: The Career Center offers advising, workshops, and resources to help you identify job and internship opportunities, work on writing your resume, practice job interviews, and attend job fairs. 
  • College Corps: Students accepted into College Corps at UC San Diego engage in community-serving opportunities that focus on K-12 education, climate action, and food insecurity, while also receiving financial compensation and other benefits.
  • Experiential Learning Hub: The Experiential Learning Hub collects a variety of resources that offer chances to grow your career background and skills.
  • Handshake: You can view and apply for jobs on campus through Handshake. 
  • The Learning Aligned Employment Program (LAEP) offers students paid research positions that may relate to their major, career goals, or the exploration of career options. LAEP is funded by the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC) to support students with financial need. Participants in this program will be hired as Research Assistants and will be paid hourly wages to conduct research with UC San Diego faculty.
  • Pre-Health and Pre-Medical Advising
  • The Undergraduate Research Hub: Offers several kinds of opportunities to engage in research as an undergraduate and to prepare for your future. 

Progress in Your Degree

Minimum Academic Progress

You must complete at least 36 units per year if you are a full time student. An academic year is defined as fall quarter through summer session. Minimum progress reflects the pace a student would need to graduate in five years if they have no previous college units. Students typically need to complete 45 units per year to be on track to graduate in four years. 

Class Standing

We determine class standing based on your total units, not time at UC San Diego.

  • A freshman is a student with 0-44.9 units
  • A sophomore is a student with 45-89.9 units
  • A junior is a student with 90-134.9 units
  • A senior is a student with 135 or more units.
  • Upper-division standing means you are a junior or senior. 
  • Upper-division courses at UCSD are numbered 100 - 199, and many (but not all) are restricted to students with upper-division standing. 

Failing and Repeating Classes

Getting a grade of D, F, or NP in the class will feel like a huge disappointment at the very least, if not a disaster. And may make you mad at the professor and this stupid university. This will suck. However, we also assume that some students will have a lousy quarter at some point of their academic career. So our academic regulations allow students to repeat any class they failed (got a D, F, or NP). In addition, for the first 16 units you repeat, the new grade will count in your GPA instead of the original grade (we basically are giving you one quarter of disastrous grades to repeat.) The original grade still shows up on your transcript (and may be something we talk about you addressing in a personal statement for graduate or professional school later on), but the new grade is all that counts to your UC GPA.

This allows a student who stumbles a chance to recover and return to good academic standing; but also assumes a student will self-correct quickly. Remember:

  • You can’t repeat a passing grade (P or a C- or better) to raise your GPA. You can only repeat a D, F, or NP in a class once. If you fail twice, you have to appeal to repeat the class. We may say no, which may force you to consider a new major.
  • You can’t repeat and replace a grade in your GPA if you failed a class as the result of an academic integrity violation. 
  • After the first 16 units, any repeats are counted alongside your original grade in calculating your GPA, which makes it much harder to raise your cumulative GPA.

Academic Probation and Subject to Disqualification

If your cumulative GPA or your GPA in any given quarter falls below 2.0, you will be put on academic probation. This sounds scary AF, but all it means is that we are watching you. Okay, I guess that does sound scary. Our goal is for you to raise your GPA in the next quarter, and we will hound you about resources.

If you continue for at least two consecutive quarters on academic probation and your cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 as well, you will become subject to academic disqualification. Also, if your gpa in any given quarter is below 1.5, even if your cumulative GPA is above 2.0, you skip straight to Subject to Disqualification. This also sounds scary AF.

When you are Subject to Disqualification, you end up on the Dean’s radar to review your records.

  • If you are Subject to Disqualification but seem to be still on track to finish your major and graduate, you will be given an exception to continue.
  • If you are Subject to Disqualification but you earned at least a 2.0 in the quarter you just finished, the Dean will see you as improving, and allow you to continue.
  • If you are looking like you are in a spiral of failing grades, particularly in your major, your records will be reviewed by the Dean, and you may become ineligible to enroll at UC San Diego for a year.

We don’t disqualify students often, but when we do, we are trying to get students out of a negative cycle of grades and prevent them from reaching a point where it is mathematically unlikely or even impossible to raise their GPA high enough to graduate. We have students take a year off to deal with the problems getting in the way of school and to come back when they are more prepared to get out of the hole they are in and move on to success in their goals and dreams.

We know that being disqualified for a year is disheartening, but it is intended to get students to get the help they need to finish their degree!

Scholarships

Muir offers many scholarships that provide supplemental funding for students pursuing specific academic opportunities. These are in addition to the scholarships found at the Financial Aid and Scholarships website

Triton Research & Experiential Learning Scholars (TRELS​)

The Triton Research & Experiential Learning Scholars (TRELS​) program is sponsored by the Council of Provosts of the Undergraduate Colleges at UC San Diego and the office of Undergraduate Research. TRELS empowers students to pursue intellectual opportunities beyond the classroom, by providing support in the form of funding and mentorship. There are four main initiatives supported through TRELS:

  1. TRELS quarterly awards 
  2. TRELS summer research program 
  3. TRELS study abroad scholarship
  4. TRELS conference funding

Visit the Undergraduate Research Hub - TRELS Program page to learn how to apply.

Jim and Julie Lin Environmental Justice Award

UCSD Muir College will award one $1,000 award to a undergraduate student who is passionate about helping underserved communities in the area of environmental justice. The award is for the 2023-2024 academic year and is available to all registered UC San Diego undergraduate students with at least junior standing and who plan to graduate during academic year 2023-2024. 

Award Description

Many communities are disproportionately affected by environmental hazards and lack of access to the decision-making processes necessary to sustain a healthy community and planet. In order to promote environmental justice in underserved communities, we must not only reduce ecological harm but also ensure that environmental laws, regulations, and policies uplift the voices of all people regardless of race, income, or other forms of bias. This award is intended for a student who is committed to helping underserved populations mobilize, sustain, and protect their communities in the face of our current climate crisis.


Examples may include students who:

  • Bridge various communities around initiatives and campaigns to reduce pollution and improve environmental health in underserved communities
  • Teach sustainability in ways that are tailored to the needs of cultural groups (composting, recycling single-use plastic containers, etc.
  • Organize efforts for underserved communities to reclaim their land
  • Facilitate access to public transit and alternative modes of transportation
  • Create engaging opportunities for underserved communities to learn about the benefits of healthy foods, community gardens, and the environment
  • Implement landscape designs, architectural designs, and community plans that include community gardens, pollution mitigation systems, and ways to reduce carbon emissions


Eligibility Requirements

A currently registered UCSD undergraduate student with good academic standing, upper division status, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher, who plans to graduate during the 2023-24 academic year, and who submits the following:


  1. Scholarship application form (which consists of short essay answers about your past experiences, proudest accomplishments, and future goals in environmental justice).
  2. One letter of recommendation from a UC San Diego faculty member that expands on your activism, projects or research. 
  3. Optional: Additional letter from a community member, staff, or faculty member familiar with your work.
  4. Resume, and links to articles/websites about your accomplishments.

Travel Scholarships

For Muir students in good standing who are presenting at domestic professional conferences, modest funds are available to defray travel costs. Students may only receive funding for ONE trip per fiscal year (July 1 - June 30), on a reimbursement basis. The application MUST be submitted 4 weeks prior to travel for approval.

Eligibility

Currently enrolled and registered students in Muir College, who are in good academic standing.

Amount

$300 per person each fiscal year (July 1 - June 30)
Can be used for the following expenses: Conference registration, transportation, lodging.

Application Procedure

As scholarships are given on a reimbursement basis, the traveler must pay all the expenses. Upon returning, they must submit all the original receipts to the Colleges Business Office. The traveler will be reimbursed after the receipts have been submitted.

  1. Please fill out this short application form and UC San Diego Student Certification for Business-Related Travel
  2. Email muirprov@ucsd.edu the completed UC San Diego Student Certification for Business-Related Travel form.
  3. Upon return from trip, please provide conference documentation including itemized receipts of any of the following: airfare, conference fees, and/or lyft. Please redact any confidential mailling address information and phone numbers as we are unable to accept those.  We are unable to reimburse non-itemized receipts.  Email these items to muirprov@ucsd.edu

Reimbursements are processed through our College Business Office.

Review

Provost Office will review all the applications and make a decision.

Follow Up

After you complete travel, please email receipts (with your name on there as the person who paid) to muirprov@ucsd.edu, and cc: Alissa Giangregorio, agiangregorio@ucsd.edu, who will follow up with getting you reimbursed. Thanks in advance for your patience, as it's a bureaucratic process that public universities have to go through.

Honors, Exchange Programs, Research, and Opportunities

UCSD students have large ambitions and high goals, and UCSD offers many opportunities for students to enhance their educational experiences while at UCSD.

Honors 

  • The university offers Regents' Scholarships to a small number of first-year students admitted as freshmen.
  • The Provost hand-picks a select group of incoming freshmen to be part of the Freshmen Honors Seminar, MUIR 90H, to be exposed to research and faculty in Fall Quarter. Regents Scholars are automatically invited to this seminar.
  • You can earn provost’s honors every quarter in which your term GPA is 3.5 or higher and you are enrolled in 12 or more graded units.
  • You can earn Latin Honors at graduation (Summa Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, and Cum Laude) for graduating in the top 14% of your class.
  • You can earn Department Honors based on completing a specific honors curriculum in your major, earning a high GPA and completing a final project in your major.
  • Muir students who reach senior status and complete at least 44 UC letter graded units with a 3.8 UC GPA are considered annually for membership in the Caledonian Society.
  • Our top graduates each spring quarter are reviewed by the provost to award a handful of awards as Muir Scholars.
  • Phi Beta Kappa is the most prestigious undergraduate honor society in the liberal arts and sciences in the United States. Each spring they nominate and initiate new members and select graduate intiate award recipients.

Minors

Minors must be at least 28 units (7 classes), typically at least 5 of which must be upper-division. The exact requirements vary from minor to minor. Things to know about minors:

  • Courses used for your minor can be used for your General Education without restriction. 
  • Lower-division courses from your major can count for your major as well. 
  • No more than 2 upper-division courses from your major can be used for your minor. 
  • Minors appear on your transcript, but not on your diploma

Taking Classes Away from UCSD

Students may use courses taken at another regionally accredited college or university to count toward graduation requirements. 

  • Look for an equivalent course on http://www.assist.org if you take the class in a California community college, or you need to talk to the department that offers the UCSD course you want to replace if you are taking it anywhere else. 
  • You may earn up to 105 quarter units of credit for lower-division transfer courses taken outside of the University of California
  • Transfer courses do not count toward your UCSD GPA unless they were taken at a University of California Campus. 
  • You must have official transcripts showing final grades submitted to UC San Diego Admissions to have them posted to your records.

Study Abroad

International experience can improve your career options and college experience. Opportunities exist for all majors, language levels, and exist for full year, one semester, or for the summer. You can still graduate on time—advisors will work with you to include study abroad in your long-term plans. Programs are affordable, and may be covered by financial aid and scholarships. For more information, visit the UCSD Study Abroad Office or search for a program to fit your needs.


College Exchange Programs

  • The UC/DC Program allows you to work, study, and live in Washington DC.
  • Simultaneous Enrollment allows you to enroll in courses at another UC campus while still at UCSD.
  • UC Online allows you to add one online course from another campus to your full-time enrollment at UCSD.
  • Cross Enrollment allows you to enroll in courses at CSU campuses.

Research and Internships, and Graduate School Preparation

  • Find research opportunities on the REAL portal
  • The Academic Internship Program (AIP) offers qualified juniors and seniors the opportunity to acquire valuable work experience related to academic and career interests.
  • All students considering an advanced degree after graduation should visit the Career Center.

Muir Special Projects Major

The Muir Special Project (MSP) major is a B.A. degree that offers Muir students the chance to develop a focused individual major culminating in a senior project or thesis. Each proposal must be approved by the Muir provost, and applicants must have a minimum 3.25 UC GPA. For further information on the MSP major, make an appointment to meet with a Muir Academic Advisor.

Dine With a Prof and Coffee with a Prof

Looking to connect with a professor or graduate teaching assistant? These programs offer you free opportunities to sit down and connect with faculty in a social setting.

Graduation and Commencement

In campus jargon,  Graduation and Commencement are separate things. 

  • Graduation is when you complete all your degree requirements and can be certified as having finished your degree. It involves a lot of paperwork, and culminates in you getting a diploma and a notation on your transcript that you completed your Bachelor’s Degree. Students can graduate in Fall Quarter, Winter Quarter, Spring Quarter, or at the end of summer sessions. 
  • Commencement is a ceremony held in June in which students are recognized for completing their degrees. You need to have senior standing to participate in Commencement, but you do not need to have completed your degree to participate in Commencement. Participation in commencement is optional and does not confer your degree. 
  • To file for Graduation, go to degree.ucsd.edu.
  • To register for Commencement, go to commencement.ucsd.edu.

Senior Graduation Checklist

Application timeframe to file for graduation
I will finish my classes in: Application Opens: Application Closes:
Winter 2024 November 8, 2023 Last day of Winter 2024 finals week
Spring 2024 February 9, 2024 Last day of Spring 2024 finals week
Summer 2024 April 15, 2024 Last day of Summer Session II 2024 finals week
Fall 2024 May 15, 2024 Last day of Fall 2024 finals week
Winter 2025 November 13, 2024 Last day of Winter 2025 finals week
Another quarter not listed here Contact Muir Advising Contact Muir Advising
  • If you have completed all of your courses for your degree and the quarter has passed, you must apply retroactively for graduation and your diploma.

  • If you have verified, eligible reasons to expedite your degree, submit a Priority Posting of Degree request form and supporting documentation to Muir Advising by the end of your graduating quarter.

  • Contact Muir College Academic Advising via the VAC if you have any questions. 

Optional June Commencement Ceremony Checklist

  • The Muir Commencement ceremony will be Sunday, June 16, 2024 from 10:00 A.M. - 12:00 p.m. PDT.
  • Register for Commencement from April 2, 2024 to May 23, 2024. Undergraduate students that register by May 1, 2024 may opt-in to have their name featured in the digital program. 
  • Purchase and pick-up your cap and gown at the UCSD Bookstore starting April 30th.
  • If you are attending the Muir Commencement ceremony, arrive 90 minutes prior to start time. Bring your commencement ticket, cap, and gown.
  • Click here for more information on the Muir Commencement Ceremony.

Other Graduation Options

Once You Have Filed

  • Generally, it takes 8-10 weeks after the end of the quarter to confer a degree. It is necessary that your degree is conferred before ordering official transcripts for grad school, etc. This time frame is not accurate for students filing retroactively or that have work-in-progress, "I" grades, or pending units transferred in from other institutions (including EAP, OAP, community college, UCDC, etc.)
  • Generally, it takes 30-60 days after your degree has been conferred to receive your printed diploma.
  • If you are applying for a summer graduation, your application will not be processed until after all UCSD Summer Sessions are complete
  • Filing a Degree and Diploma Application does not ensure graduation. Conferring your degree is subject to review and approval of your college and major department(s).
After graduation, you cannot continue to enroll as a UC San Diego undergraduate. You would need to be admitted as a graduate student, take UCSD courses through Summer Session, or take courses through the UC San Diego Extended Studies Concurrent Enrollment Program.