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MCWP 125 and 125R Course Descriptions

  • All students with more than 90 cumulative units will be automatically preauthorized, with a note placed on their Virtual Advising Center (VAC) contact record prior to registration each quarter.  If you have registration problems, or don't see a preauthorization on your VAC record, please contact the Muir Writing office in person at HSS 2346 or by sending a message on the Virtual Advising Center. 
  • Important Note: Students on the waitlist who miss any class meeting of Muir Writing will be considered NOT ELIGIBLE TO ENROLL in the course. Enrolled students who miss the first two class sessions will be asked to drop the course. **Responsibility for dropping the class from the Registrar’s records belongs solely to the student.**

    The reading and writing requirements are the same for all sections. Books and course readers for each section will be available at the UC San Diego Bookstore, located in the Price Center.

    Changes to times or section ID will be noted in bold and with an asterisk (*)

 

Texts

The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition

  • The Craft of Research, Fourth Edition by Wayne Booth, Gregory Colomb, Joseph Williams, Joseph Bizup and William T. FitzGerald

A Writer's Reference, 10th Edition

by Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers

Please purchase the 10th edition of the Writer's Reference from the bookstore, as we have a version that is specific for UC San Diego's Writing Programs.

Student- printed Reader

We no longer require students to purchase a reader, but rather have students print out articles for use in class

Spring 2024

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SEC. ID

SEC.

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

414674

B00

TR

8:00-9:20

2305B

Guillen, Melinda

414678

C00

TR

9:30-10:50

2305B

Guillen, Melinda

414682

D00

TR

11:00-12:20

2305B

Guillen, Melinda

Winter 2024

Educating California

Every way you look at education in California, it is big: from a K-12 system that educates more than 6 million students a year to the 116 community colleges with more than 1.5 million students, from the California State University system, the largest public university system in the U.S., to the ten campuses of the University of California. Educating California is a huge project that has everything to do with equity, opportunity, diversity, community and innovation. Where is the state succeeding? Where is it falling short? How can a single state keep such a huge educational project moving forward? In this class, students will take some small part of this very large topic to research, ultimately proposing and writing their own argument-based research paper.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

309261

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

104263

B00

TTh 8:00-9:30

HSS 2305B

Melinda Guillen

104264

C00

TTh 9:30-10:50

HSS 1106B

Melinda Guillen

Space, Place, Nature, Home (Remote)

This course is offered at the time scheduled, on zoom

Space and place, particularly in relation to third and fourth terms, nature and home, are frequently taken for granted, as objective realities, or otherwise sublimated into our daily existence. However, they are terms that are also general enough to be debatable in everything from philosophical discourse to political theory, literature, anthropology, history, arts and culture, cinema and television, and more. Conflicting notions of place and home can fuel international conflicts and war. The history of conceptions around nature and wilderness as well as the human impact on the natural world have changed our health and our environment. In the arts, one can witness a history of human thinking in changing depictions of nature, or consider the different approaches to space and place in sculpture and architecture.

Assigned readings/screenings draw upon philosophy and geography as well as cultural and visual theory and architectural history. Students will read about the creator of Central Park, Frederick Law Olmstead, but they will also learn from Las Vegas and consider the Center for Land Use Interpretation's (CLUI) digital archive. How have the concepts of "nature" and "wilderness" shifted over time? What are the key works of culture or philosophical developments pertaining to our changing spatial experience and understanding of the world? How have the internet, car culture, and global travel changed our experience of space? How are the ideologies of late capitalism communicated by the modern city? 

Students will develop a focused topic and research question in relation to the course topic; identify a scholarly debate, or research conversation; propose a project that will participate in that conversation; engage with sources from the research process in the form of an annotated and evaluative bibliography, and construct an academic research-based argument.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

309310

A00

MW 12:30-1:50

REMOTE

Elizabeth Miller

309336

B00

MW 2:00-3:20

REMOTE

Elizabeth Miller

309379

C00

MW 3:30-4:50

REMOTE

Elizabeth Miller

Spring 2023

Educating California

Every way you look at education in California, it is big: from a K-12 system that educates more than 6 million students a year to the 116 community colleges with more than 1.5 million students, from the California State University system, the largest public university system in the U.S., to the ten campuses of the University of California. Educating California is a huge project that has everything to do with equity, opportunity, diversity, community and innovation. Where is the state succeeding? Where is it falling short? How can a single state keep such a huge educational project moving forward? In this class, students will take some small part of this very large topic to research, ultimately proposing and writing their own argument-based research paper.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

138880

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

138881

B00

TTh 12:30-1:50

MANDE B-146

Melinda Guillen

138884

C00

TTh 2:00-3:20

MANDE B-146

Melinda Guillen

138887

D00

TTh 3:30-4:50

MANDE B-146

Melinda Guillen

Art and Politics (REMOTE)

The political sphere includes and regulates many things that have a direct effect on our livelihoods and communities: minimum wage, access to healthcare, immigration, infrastructure, the regulation of our bodies, whom we can marry, and so much more. Such issues have also come up in the arts, in everything from early 20th century mural painting to more recent examples like the art and iconography of Black Lives Matter and Pride as well as museum-focused protests like those that pressured tear gas manufacturer Warren Kanders to resign from his position at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019. This topic explores art in politics and politics in art, ranging from antiwar arts activism in the 1960s, the social politics of representing BIPOC histories and individuals, boycott and divestment, and various case studies of both artists and notorious controversies that highlight the tensions between artists/makers, artworks, audiences, local communities, as well as, of course, the museum as a mediating institution. Assigned readings draw on art history and museum studies, but the subject matter of the course will also touch on various social histories, critical race theory, and gender studies. How do the arts intersect with and/or represent political issues, movements, themes, and identities? What roles does politics play in the arts, and vice versa?  Possible research topics include the connections between the arts and politics pertaining to social justice movements, activism, globalization, labor practices, protests, museums and more. Students will identify a scholarly debate, or research conversation, propose a project that will participate in that conversation, engage with and analyze sources from the research process in the form of an annotated bibliography, and construct an academic research argument.

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

 

A00

MW TBD

REMOTE

Elizabeth Miller

 

B00

MW TBD

REMOTE

Elizabeth Miller

Winter 2023

Educating California

Every way you look at education in California, it is big: from a K-12 system that educates more than 6 million students a year to the 116 community colleges with more than 1.5 million students, from the California State University system, the largest public university system in the U.S., to the ten campuses of the University of California. Educating California is a huge project that has everything to do with equity, opportunity, diversity, community and innovation. Where is the state succeeding? Where is it falling short? How can a single state keep such a huge educational project moving forward? In this class, students will take some small part of this very large topic to research, ultimately proposing and writing their own argument-based research paper.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

104262

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

104263

B00

TTh 9:30-10:50

HSS 2305B

Melinda Guillen

104264

C00

TTh 11:00-12:20

HSS 1106B

Melinda Guillen

Art and Politics

The political sphere includes and regulates many things that have a direct effect on our livelihoods and communities: minimum wage, access to healthcare, immigration, infrastructure, the regulation of our bodies, whom we can marry, and so much more. Such issues have also come up in the arts, in everything from early 20th century mural painting to more recent examples like the art and iconography of Black Lives Matter and Pride as well as museum-focused protests like those that pressured tear gas manufacturer Warren Kanders to resign from his position at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019. This topic explores art in politics and politics in art, ranging from antiwar arts activism in the 1960s, the social politics of representing BIPOC histories and individuals, boycott and divestment, and various case studies of both artists and notorious controversies that highlight the tensions between artists/makers, artworks, audiences, local communities, as well as, of course, the museum as a mediating institution. Assigned readings draw on art history and museum studies, but the subject matter of the course will also touch on various social histories, critical race theory, and gender studies. How do the arts intersect with and/or represent political issues, movements, themes, and identities? What roles does politics play in the arts, and vice versa?  Possible research topics include the connections between the arts and politics pertaining to social justice movements, activism, globalization, labor practices, protests, museums and more. Students will identify a scholarly debate, or research conversation, propose a project that will participate in that conversation, engage with and analyze sources from the research process in the form of an annotated bibliography, and construct an academic research argument.

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

104265

D00

MW 2:00-3:20

Mandeville B-146

Elizabeth Miller

104266

E00

MW 3:30-4:50

Mandeville B-146

Elizabeth Miller

104267

F00

MW 5:00-6:20

Mandeville B-146

Elizabeth Miller

Summer 2022

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

093169

A00

TTH 11:00-1:50

REMOTE

Melinda Guillen

Spring 2022

Art and Politics

The political sphere includes and regulates many things that have a direct effect on our livelihoods and communities: minimum wage, access to healthcare, immigration, infrastructure, the regulation of our bodies, whom we can marry, and so much more. Such issues have also come up in the arts, in everything from early 20th century murals to more recent examples as well as museum-focused protests like those that pressured tear gas manufacturer Warren Kanders to resign from his position at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019. This topic explores art in politics and politics in art, ranging from antiwar arts activism in the 1960s, the social politics of representing BIPOC histories and individuals, boycott and divestment, and various case studies of both artists and notorious controversies that highlight the tensions between artists/makers, artworks, audiences, local communities, and the museum as mediating institution. Assigned readings draw on art history and museum studies, but the subject matter of the course will also touch on various social histories. How do the arts intersect with and/or represent political issues, movements, themes, and identities? What roles does politics play in the arts, and vice versa? What are some of the past and recent controversies in the arts, and what kinds of art have been considered transgressive? Where and how do conversations about censorship and freedom of speech fit into the picture? Possible research topics include (but are not limited to) the connections between the arts and politics pertaining to social justice movements, activism, globalization, labor practices, funding structures, war, museums and/or stakeholders, and more.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

074917

B00

TTH 12:30-1:50

HSS 2305A

Elizabeth Miller

074918

C00

TTH 2:00-3:20

HSS 2305A

Elizabeth Miller

Educating California

Every way you look at education in California, it is big: from a K-12 system that educates more than 6 million students a year to the 116 community colleges with more than 1.5 million students, from the California State University system, the largest public university system in the U.S., to the ten campuses of the University of California. Educating California is a huge project that has everything to do with equity, opportunity, diversity, community and innovation. Where is the state succeeding? Where is it falling short? How can a single state keep such a huge educational project moving forward? In this class, students will take some small part of this very large topic to research, ultimately proposing and writing their own argument-based research paper.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

074916

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument. 

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

074919

D00

MW 9:30-10:50

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

074920

E00

MW 11:00-12:20

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

074921

F00

MW 12:30-1:50

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

Winter 2022

Art and Politics

The political sphere includes and regulates many things that have a direct effect on our livelihoods and communities: minimum wage, access to healthcare, immigration, infrastructure, the regulation of our bodies, whom we can marry, and so much more. Such issues have also come up in the arts, in everything from early 20th century mural painting to more recent examples like the art and iconography of Black Lives Matter and Pride as well as museum-focused protests like those that pressured tear gas manufacturer Warren Kanders to resign from his position at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019. This topic explores art in politics and politics in art, ranging from antiwar arts activism in the 1960s, the social politics of representing BIPOC histories and individuals, boycott and divestment, and various case studies of both artists and notorious controversies that highlight the tensions between artists/makers, artworks, audiences, local communities, as well as, of course, the museum as a mediating institution. Assigned readings draw on art history and museum studies, but the subject matter of the course will also touch on various social histories, critical race theory, and gender studies. How do the arts intersect with and/or represent political issues, movements, themes, and identities? What roles does politics play in the arts, and vice versa?  Possible research topics include the connections between the arts and politics pertaining to social justice movements, activism, globalization, labor practices, protests, museums and more. Students will identify a scholarly debate, or research conversation, propose a project that will participate in that conversation, engage with and analyze sources from the research process in the form of an annotated bibliography, and construct an academic research argument.

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

069247

B00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 1106B

Elizabeth Miller

069248

C00

TTH 12:30-1:50

HSS 1106B

Elizabeth Miller

069249

D00

TTH 2:00-3:20

HSS 1106B

Elizabeth Miller

Housing The California Dream

Nearly one-fourth of the homeless people in the United States are in California, which—not surprisingly—has some of the most expensive housing in the country. Indeed, rent for even small apartments in Los Angeles costs approximately twice the national average. Meanwhile in San Diego what was considered modest tract housing in the middle of the 20th Century now goes for much more than a middle class family can afford. And, ironically, the financial success of Silicon Valley has made San Francisco and Oakland have all but uninhabitable for anyone but the very wealthy. The impacts of this housing crisis are far reaching: long commutes to work (with ensuing air pollution issues); fights over vacation rentals like Airbnb; and tens of thousands of Californians living unsheltered each night. In this course we will read, analyze, research, and write about these and other issues that make housing so complicated in California. You will familiarize yourself with a scholarly debate about some aspect of the California housing crisis, write a research proposal and an annotated bibliography on that debated issue, and finish the quarter with a research-based argument that is your contribution to that debate.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

069246

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument.   

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

069250

E00

MW 9:30-10:50

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

069251

F00

MW 11:00-12:20

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

Fall 2021

Art and Politics

The political sphere includes and regulates many things that have a direct effect on our livelihoods and communities: minimum wage, access to healthcare, immigration, infrastructure, the regulation of our bodies, whom we can marry, and so much more. Such issues have also come up in the arts, in everything from early 20th century mural painting to more recent examples like the art and iconography of Black Lives Matter and Pride as well as museum-focused protests like those that pressured tear gas manufacturer Warren Kanders to resign from his position at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2019. This topic explores art in politics and politics in art, ranging from antiwar arts activism in the 1960s, the social politics of representing BIPOC histories and individuals, boycott and divestment, and various case studies of both artists and notorious controversies that highlight the tensions between artists/makers, artworks, audiences, local communities, as well as, of course, the museum as a mediating institution. Assigned readings draw on art history and museum studies, but the subject matter of the course will also touch on various social histories, critical race theory, and gender studies. How do the arts intersect with and/or represent political issues, movements, themes, and identities? What roles does politics play in the arts, and vice versa?  Possible research topics include the connections between the arts and politics pertaining to social justice movements, activism, globalization, labor practices, protests, museums and more. Students will identify a scholarly debate, or research conversation, propose a project that will participate in that conversation, engage with and analyze sources from the research process in the form of an annotated bibliography, and construct an academic research argument.

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

051221

B00

TTH 9:30-10:50

HSS 2305A

Elizabeth Miller

051222

C00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2305A

Elizabeth Miller

051223

D00

TTH 12:30-1:50

HSS 2305A

Elizabeth Miller

Housing The California Dream

Nearly one-fourth of the homeless people in the United States are in California, which—not surprisingly—has some of the most expensive housing in the country. Indeed, rent for even small apartments in Los Angeles costs approximately twice the national average. Meanwhile in San Diego what was considered modest tract housing in the middle of the 20th Century now goes for much more than a middle class family can afford. And, ironically, the financial success of Silicon Valley has made San Francisco and Oakland have all but uninhabitable for anyone but the very wealthy. The impacts of this housing crisis are far reaching: long commutes to work (with ensuing air pollution issues); fights over vacation rentals like Airbnb; and tens of thousands of Californians living unsheltered each night. In this course we will read, analyze, research, and write about these and other issues that make housing so complicated in California. You will familiarize yourself with a scholarly debate about some aspect of the California housing crisis, write a research proposal and an annotated bibliography on that debated issue, and finish the quarter with a research-based argument that is your contribution to that debate.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

051220

A00

TTH 11:00-12:20

HSS 2346A

Marion Wilson

Youth Movements, Countercultures, and The Status Quo

Youth-led movements are driving forces in American history, social progress, and consumer culture. Yet, their crucial contributions are frequently dismissed in mainstream outlets as fleeting or uninformed and are too often reduced to arbitrary generational divides. From student activism in the Civil Rights era to figures such as Emma Gonzaléz, Malala Yousafzai, and Greta Thunberg; art movements; music genres like punk rock and hip hop; streetwear fashion; hacktivists and social media influencers – young people continue to shape society in diverse and meaningful ways.  

This course will interrogate the many influences of youth movements and what happens when subversive groups with counter-cultural messages challenge or disrupt the status quo. We will discuss the history and impact of student activism in American universities and when radical actions go mainstream such as Earth Day. We will also explore sub- and counter-cultural groups including drag queens, K-pop fans, young chonga women, and more. Research projects will address how crucial and undervalued student organizing and/or youth culture are in today’s social, political, and economic landscape.

Assigned readings draw upon interdisciplinary fields in the humanities and social sciences including communication and media studies, art history, ethnic studies, cultural criticism, sociology, and gender studies. In this course, students will select a movement or countercultural group; develop a research question; identify a scholarly debate or research conversation; propose a research project that will participate in the identified conversation; research and analyze scholarly sources in the form of an annotated bibliography and construct an original academic research-based argument.   

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

051224

E00

MW 9:30-10:50

HSS 2305B

Melinda Guillen

051225

F00

MW 11:00-12:20

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

051226

G00

MW 12:30-1:50

HSS 2305A

Melinda Guillen

Winter 2021

Housing the California Dream

Nearly one-fourth of the homeless people in the United States are in California, which—not surprisingly—has some of the most expensive housing in the country. Indeed, rent for even small apartments in Los Angeles costs approximately twice the national average. Meanwhile in San Diego what was considered modest tract housing in the middle of the 20th Century now goes for much more than a middle class family can afford. And, ironically, the financial success of Silicon Valley has made San Francisco and Oakland have all but uninhabitable for anyone but the very wealthy. The impacts of this housing crisis are far reaching: long commutes to work (with ensuing air pollution issues); fights over vacation rentals like Airbnb; and tens of thousands of Californians living unsheltered each night. In this course we will read, analyze, research, and write about these and other issues that make housing so complicated in California. You will familiarize yourself with a scholarly debate about some aspect of the California housing crisis, write a research proposal and an annotated bibliography on that debated issue, and finish the quarter with a research-based argument that is your contribution to that debate.

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

034601

A00

TTH 9:00-10:50

CSB 1

Marion Wilson

034602

B00

TTH 11:00-12:20

CSB 1

Marion Wilson

Exhibiting Art: Representation, Censorship, and Other Tales from Museum Studies

For this topic, we consider the role of exhibitions as they relate to cultural production. The modern “exhibition” as such historically emerged from private collection displays called wunderkammern, or cabinets of curiosity. Museum exhibitions in particular have played a particularly significant role in how we perceive works of culture, people, and places. More recently, efforts have been made to address accessibility issues, integrate decolonizing initiatives, and provide greater visibility to historically disenfranchised groups. Art exhibitions can take a variety of formats depending on what types of objects and information are on display as well as the cultural backgrounds, perspectives, and intentions of the artists, curators, organizers, hosting institutions, and/or audiences. What are the social and political forces behind exhibitions and what kinds of messages do they convey? To whom are these messages communicated? How do exhibitions express power relations and represent different interests? Assigned readings will draw on museum studies, art history, and cultural anthropology from the past 50 years. Possible research topics can range from unconventional and historical formats like 19th century exhibits/displays, fairs, or expositions to international art biennials, museum and gallery exhibitions. Any type of artistic or creative medium and any period in history are appropriate for investigation in your research projects.

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

034552

E00

MW 12:30-1:50

RCLAS R176

Elizabeth Miller

034553

F00

MW 2:00-3:20

RCLAS R204

Elizabeth Miller

034554

G00

MW 3:30-4:50

RCLAS R188

Elizabeth Miller

(Re)Writing Equality

Since 1776, when our forefathers codified equality as a “self-evident” truth in the Declaration of Independence, we have had to confront the enslavement, marginalization, violence, disenfranchisement, and exclusion that reveal equality to be an American myth. The written word has the power to codify myth as reality, but it also has the power to reveal truth, to mobilize action, and to correct inequality. Supreme Court decisions, government legislation, and policy are obvious written actions that revise the way that we think about equality in America, but countless other written documents demand social, cultural, political, and environmental shifts in power: “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the letters and diaries of Japanese American citizens interned during World War II, Yessenia Funes’s intersectional writings on the climate crisis, Chrissy Teigen’s twitter account, and so much more. In this course, you will select a written text that “(re)writes equality”. You will research scholarly debates that will allow you to situate this text within a social justice movement, propose a research project that will participate in that debate, engage with sources that you find in your research in the form of an annotated bibliography, and construct your own academic research-based argument that makes an original claim about the complex and contested ideal of American equality.  

 

SECTION ID

SECTION

DAY/TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

034550

C00

TTH 12:30-1:50

RCLAS R208

Amy Forrest

034551

D00

TTH 11:00-12:20

RCLAS R224

Amy Forrest