Muir College Campus

Muir Buildings


Muir College is located on the western edge of UC San Diego along North Torrey Pines Road and is the closest of the UC San Diego colleges to the beach. Several of its buildings, including freshman residences Tioga and Tenaya Halls, are the tallest on campus, with views from the upper stories overlooking the Pacific Ocean and Scripps Coastal Reserve. Torrey pines, Monterey pines, and other trees give Muir the sense of being a campus in the forest.

In honor of John Muir, the names of many buildings and gathering places at Muir evoke the landscape of Yosemite National Park, which Muir urged the federal government to establish. These include -- in addition to Tioga and Tenaya Halls – the Tuolumne and Tamarack Apartments for second-year students, Half-Dome Lounge, Redwood Lounge, Clouds Rest student organization offices, and The Pines Dining Commons. The Muir Woods coffee house is named for the Muir Woods National Monument, a protected forest of coastal redwoods located in California’s Marin County.

Architecture

In 2007, Muir College was awarded a $99,000 Campus Heritage Grant by the prestigious Getty Foundation to draw up a historical resources assessment and preservation plan for the College’s signature ensemble of Modernist buildings. Beginning in the late 1960’s and continuing into the early 1970’s, executive architect Robert Mosher of the firm Mosher and Drew led a team of San Diego-based architects whose work at UC San Diego and beyond helped define architectural Modernism in Southern California as well as in La Jolla proper.

The coordinated work of these architects resulted in a college campus of striking architectural consistency. The use throughout of board-formed concrete, block-like massing, modular design vocabulary, and the exterior expression of structure and interior spaces all reflect the ideals of mid-century Modernism. The buildings in the campus core are united further by outdoor courtyards, covered walkways, and the surrounding landscape, which was designed originally by San Diego landscape architect Joseph Yamada.

Muir Architecture

Muir’s founding Provost John L. Stewart wrote in 1965, "I believe buildings have a radical influence upon living and learning. I am thinking not just of their operational efficiency, but of attitudes, what stays in the memory, and the releasing and directing of intellectual and creative energies." The College's distinctive and consistent architecture, human-scaled connecting courtyards and walkways, and inward-turning orientation of the core campus as a whole are elements that create a strong sense of place and make its student, faculty, and staff inhabitants feel that they are part of a cohesive community.

In October 2009, construction began on the first new building to be added to the Muir campus since the early 1970’s. This apartment-style residence for second-year students, located immediately to the east of the Tuolumne Apartments, was designed by the San Diego architectural firm Delawie, Wilkes, Rodrigues, and Barker, in consultation with Robert Mosher and Dale Naegle, designer of Muir’s original residential buildings, to harmonize with the College’s signature Modernist style.

The Stuart Collection at Muir

The Stuart Collection is UCSD’s collection of outdoor site-specific art works by some of the leading artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. The Muir campus is home to two of these works: the Sun God by Niki de Saint Phalle, a beloved campus symbol on the lawn in front of the Mandeville Center, and Green Table by Jenny Holzer, adjacent to the Muir Middle Quad. The Green Table has become a favorite meeting place or just a quiet place for lunch or study.

Muir College Walking Tour

Muir Map

1. STEWART COMMONS
Dining Commons, Muir Woods Coffee House,
Middle of Muir, and Student Affairs offices
1969, Dale Naegle
Stewart Commons
2. TENAYA HALL
Residence for primarily
first-year students
1968, Dale Naegle
Tenaya Hall
3. TIOGA HALL
Residence for primarily
first-year students
1968, Dale Naegle
Tioga Building
4. TUOLUMNE APARTMENTS
Residence for primarily
second-year students
1970, Dale Naegle
Muir College Apartments
5. HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES
Muir College Administrative Offices
Muir College Writing Program
Departments of History and Philosophy
1969, Richard George Wheeler & Associates
HSS Building 6. MUIR BIOLOGY
Division of Biological Sciences (in part)
1969, Liebhardt & Weston
Biology Building
7. APPLIED PHYSICS & MATHEMATICS
Departments of Linguistics and Mathematics
1969, Robert Mosher
APM Building 8. McGILL HALL
Department of Psychology
1970, Frank L. Hope & Associates
McGill Hall
9. MANDLER HALL
Department of Psychology
1970, Frank L. Hope & Associates
Mandler Hall 10. GYMNASIUM
1965, Liebhardt & Weston
Gymnasium
11. NATATORIUM
1965, Liebhardt & Weston
Natatorium 12. MANDEVILLE CENTER
FOR THE ARTS

Departments of
Visual Arts & Music
Mandeville Auditorium
& Recital Hall
1975, A. Quincy Jones
Mandeville Center
13. TAMARACK APARTMENTS
Residence for primarily second-year students
Opening 2011, Michael Wilkes
Tamarack Apartments